Human trafficking is a criminal offence committed with the purpose of exploiting another human being by the trafficker, or enabling others to do so. Trafficking does not necessarily have to take place across borders, it can also take place within a country. Traffickers may use deception, direct or indirect threats of physical violence, exploitation of the victim’s helplessness, etc. to lure the victim and break their resistance.

The aim is to force a person to work under unusual conditions, engage in prostitution, beg, marry, commit a crime or perform some other repugnant obligation.

Human trafficking is a criminal offence committed with the purpose of exploiting another human being by the trafficker, or enabling others to do so. Trafficking does not necessarily have to take place across borders, it can also take place within a country. Traffickers may use deception, direct or indirect threats of physical violence, exploitation of the victim’s helplessness, etc. to lure the victim and break their resistance.

The aim is to force a person to work under unusual conditions, engage in prostitution, beg, marry, commit a crime or perform some other repugnant obligation.

What is human trafficking?

A precondition that human trafficking requires is an ACTION, performed to EXPLOIT someone, which involves the use of certain MEANS to gain control over the victim.

The element of HUMAN TRAFFICKING occurs when all three conditions are met: ACTION + EXPLOITATION + MEANS.

What does a trafficker do? They:

  • recruit – mediating negotiations and involving third parties, for example, to advertise jobs in the media, etc.;
  • transport and/or abduct – transporting a person from one place to another by land, air or water, by any means of transport; taking a person to a requested place and escorting or assisting them in leaving (arriving);
  • transfer – leaving a recruited person in a required place for exploitation or handing them over to someone else;
  • harbour – providing a place of stay for a person to achieve control over the person’s movement;
  • hide – keeping a person in a place unknown to others; making sure that no one can know the person’s whereabouts;
  • receive – waiting for and receiving a (kidnapped) person who has been brought in;
  • control – controlling a person’s actions.

The aim of the activities is EXPLOITATION:

  • involvement in crime, such as theft and recruitment of other victims;
  • the provision of forced sexual services;
  • slavery – the restriction of a person’s freedom and total control over them. A person is not allowed to leave their room, socialise with relatives or friends, they must accept foreign traditions, etc. Psychological and physical violence, total economic dependency, living with a constant sense of danger.

By exploitation:

  • the victim is made to believe that it is not possible for them to refuse certain services/activities.

A method of coercion, i.e., a MEANS is:

  • for example, physical, emotional, sexual, psychological violence, or;
  • misleading, deceiving, defrauding, enticing a person.

The victim loses control of their physical or psychological freedom in the process.

It is impossible to carry out human trafficking activities out of negligence. The perpetrator knows that their actions are harmful and deliberately carries them out or allows them to happen.

Human trafficking is a criminal offence committed with the purpose of exploiting another human being by the trafficker, or enabling others to do so. Trafficking does not necessarily have to take place across borders, it can also take place within a country. Traffickers may use deception, direct or indirect threats of physical violence, exploitation of the victim’s helplessness, etc. to lure the victim and break their resistance.

The aim is to force a person to work under unusual conditions, engage in prostitution, beg, marry, commit a crime or perform some other repugnant obligation.

What is human trafficking?

Human trafficking helpline 6607 320

Human trafficking prevention and victim assistance helpline + 372 6607 320

Are you being forced to do a job you do not agree to, are you not being paid, are you being lured into prostitution, into a sham marriage, have your agreements been broken, have your documents been taken away, are your being threatened? Are you confused and do not know what to do? For help, call the human trafficking prevention and victim assistance helpline +372 660 7320 (Mon–Thu 8:30–16:30, Fri 8:30–15:30) or write to inimkaubandus@sotsiaalkindlustusamet.ee. Also follow us at https://www.facebook.com/inimkaubandus  

We will talk to you about:

  • the possible consequences of illegal employment;
  • advice for people going abroad or coming to work or study in Estonia;
  • how to avoid becoming a victim of human trafficking;
  • contacts of organisations abroad that provide assistance and counselling to victims of labour or sexual exploitation;
  • contacts of organisations working on the prevention of human trafficking in Estonia and help with communication;
  • finding help for victims of human trafficking with the existing services.